Classic Words that Stick

I love the classics. TaglineGuru.com developed a fantastic list of the best-ever taglines since 1948. What a joy to read, and to examine how each short line connects with its audience.

 

But further down on the page is the really good stuff. It’s a list of the best taglines prior to 1948. Some are so strong that they’re still in use today. Check out the year they were first used to truly appreciate the staying power of a carefully crafted message. You can get the complete list here: BEST TAGLINE LIST.  

Celebrated Taglines Prior to 1948

Only you can prevent forest fires. (U.S. Forest Service)
1944
The beer that made Milwaukee famous. (Schlitz Beer)
1940
Look sharp, feel sharp. (Gillette)
1940s
Better living through chemistry. (DuPont)
1939
The breakfast of champions. (Wheaties)
1935
The pause that refreshes. (Coca-Cola)
1929
When you care enough to send the very best (Hallmark)
1934
Good to the last drop. (Maxwell House)
1926
Ask the man who owns one. (Packard)
1925
Always a bridesmaid, but never a bride. (Listerine)
1923
I’d walk a mile for a Camel. (Camel Cigarettes)
1921
Say it with flowers. (FTD)
1917
When it rains, it pours. (Morton Salt)
1911
The champagne of bottled beer. (Miller High Life)
1906
America’s most famous dessert (Jell-O)
1902
His master’s voice. (Victor Talking Machine Company)
1899
57 varieties. (H.J. Heinz Co.)
1896
All the news that’s fit to print. (New York Times)
1896
99.44% pure (Ivory Soap)
1882

 

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3 Comments on “Classic Words that Stick”

  1. ann-marie says:

    I think the most amazing thing–fascinating really–is that (most of) these taglines don’t use the product name! Nor do they directly reference anything about the product itself. For example: 57 varieties–well, of what?

    When you get a chance, Patti, would you write about that? How is it that taglines connect with/to the product? How do they do that?

    Thanks for the great blog! Keep writing!

  2. Ivana Taylor says:

    I honestly had no idea that some of these were THAT OLD! Thanks for bringing these out – I think we can all learn from these classics.

  3. john kuhar says:

    I really enjoyed reading this. You are truely a gifted Wordsmith!!


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